• Work Life Balance

    Lawtina Book Club: Make Your Home Among Strangers

    ok a teensy bit delayed with our bookclub I know, but I think the chaos we’re in gives me a bit of an excuse. #mybad For (last month’s) pick, we selected Make Your Home Among Strangers by Jennine Capo Crucet. It is her first novel (though she recently had a second published). And unfortunately, she made the news because at recent lecture at a college, some students couldn’t handle discussing racism and took to burning her book (!) as protest. I mean, wtf. It was appalling and immediately I wanted to support this author by lifting up her work. Doing so, though, is not difficult because wow wow wow–what a…

  • Issues,  Law School,  Legal Practice

    The Danger in Being the First

    Wow, so I didn’t think I would write anything substantial about the American Dirt publishing industry scandal but like always Latino USA came through and inspired me. To bring ppl up to speed, American Dirt was written by a White woman and given a seven figure (!) advance by a publishing industry that then turned around and spent even more money to promote it. They landed promos with Latina influencers, a spot on Oprah’s book club, and blurb by the Chicana literary icon, Sandra Cisneros. The book, while fiction, seemed to be steeped in stereotypes and an obvious lack of knowledge of what it means to be Mexican. When a…

  • Work Life Balance

    Lawtina Book Club: Sabrina and Corina

    When I first decided to read this book by Kali Fajardo Anstine, I was mostly intrigued because a lot of the Latina content creators I follow were mentioning it. I purchased it and didn’t even read the blurb, assuming it was a novel about two women. Well, let me be the first to explain this is actually a collection of short stories and I don’t think I have a read a piece like this ever in my life. Sabrina and Corina spans across different women, in different seasons of their lives and yet ties them together with similar tragic, painful, and often violent experiences. A little warning, if you can’t…

  • Legal Practice,  Work Life Balance

    50 Lessons for Women Lawyers, a Review

    A few weeks ago I received a copy of 50 Lessons for Women Lawyers by Nora Riva Bergman. This book is a compilation of contribution from 50 successful, accomplished women lawyers in the U.S. and Canada. The attorneys are in different stages in their life, have had different careers, experiences—it is a really great group of people offering guidance. What I appreciate is that many of the contributors share vulnerable moments in their personal life and careers that are experiences many of us can relate to—the attorney who opts to take a break to take care of children, the one who experienced domestic violence as a child, and the most…

  • SideBar

    Side Bar: March Madness

    Truly, Madness. It was a whirlwind of a month with E moving and getting everything prepped for that, but here are the highlights: Vacation in Puerto Vallarta. I mean, Mexico is beautiful, the beach is amazing, food is delicious, and you can’t beat sitting just a few feet away from the water while drinking fruity cocktails all day. 2. At the beach I read White Fragility: Why it’s so Hard for White People to Talk about Racism by Robin DiAngelo and it is a must read. I have recommended it to so many colleagues and took so many notes—eye opening and had me yelling “aha!” at the beach because it…

  • Uncategorized

    Lawtina Book Club: Becoming x Michelle Obama

    First, so excited for this first rendition of our book club! We’ll try different platforms as we go along, but I thought it made sense to make the first discussion here. And because everyone and their mother received Becoming for the holidays (or so it seemed) this seemed like the logical first choice. Overall, I loved it! She gave us such great snippets of her life from the beginning of a relationship with an up and coming politician to  the tiring and the glamorous parts of being First Lady. But really what I took from their story is how difficult it is to be a political family, especially with young…

  • Issues,  Work Life Balance

    American Like Me: A Book Review

    On one of my first days of school in the U.S. a young boy approached me and asked: What color are you? I had never been asked this before and remember showing him my arm, confused that this poor boy didn’t know his colors and answered:  I’m tan.  Later when I told my mom what happened, she laughed and said if someone asks you that again just say you’re Mexican. Easy enough. However, as I grew up, I realized the complexities of race in the U.S. I grappled with my own cultural identity and picking the right “label.” It’s all so complicated and made more so by the fact that…

  • Work Life Balance

    A Spark: Books that Empower Latinas

    So, the sad truth is there are many Latina authors, but they are not supported and very rarely get the same backing as other authors. That’s why it feels rare to read a book by Latinas. I’ve mentioned before that I’ve edited my social media followings to include mostly & primarily women of color. When I think about it, I realize it stems from my reading habits. Like most of you, I love reading and when I was little, the library was our refuge. My mom would take me to the local library and it would provide solace and peace away from homes that were, at times, tumultuous. I was…

  • SideBar

    Sidebar: Did I get any color?

    February was a whirlwind–it feels like it was a million years ago but probably because I had so much going on–which is nice because I like being busy but also that means that there is only so much I can do with my limited hours. And sometimes this site suffers, which I don’t like, but thanks for your patience! The most important part was that I went on a badly, sorely needed, well-deserved vacation at the beginning of the month. We went to Puerto Vallarta, which is just heaven. I’m sure there’s more to do in Vallarta than sit at a beach, but that’s literally all I want to do…

  • Issues,  Law School

    Your Goals Matter

    First, sorry not sorry, but I can’t get off the Not Your Perfect Mexican Daughter train–it was just such a good book! But it definitely has kept me thinking–in the novel, the imperfect daughter, Julia, struggles with meeting the standards her family sets and is more focused on creating a life for herself that’s different than what her small neighborhood has to offer–she wants to be a writer, go to college, see the world. Her parents don’t get why she can’t be happy to have a steady job and stay at home with her family. There were so many scenes where I was rooting for Julia and became just as…